managers

5 Manager Mistakes (That Make Good Employees Quit)

Few things do as much damage to your business as good employees leaving. And few things can chase away an employee as effectively as a bad manager. Research has proven that up to 70% of employee motivation depends on the manager. Hold your managers accountable, and keep good workers from leaving before they put in their notice!

Overworking

Employees burn out fast once you start overworking them. But it’s a tempting trap for managers to fall into because, to them, surely there’s some way to get more work out of good employees. The problem is, if you’re going to increase the amount of work or the time someone must work, you must balance this with status changes. Give them a raise, promotion, or a title change if you must work them harder.

Lack of Empathy

Another reason employees burn out fast is when they don’t feel understood, particularly when there’s a difficulty affecting performance at work or home. This could be another coworker who makes it difficult to focus or to accomplish a project; or a too-heavy workload. Managers should be able to empathize with their team and to help members achieve their goals. However, a manager who fails at this will always have a higher turnover rate. Team members can’t work for someone who sees them as cogs, rather than people.

No Feedback

Employees, especially Millennials, desire recognition. That doesn’t mean a gold star for every task, but it does mean acknowledging work done, progress made, and goals achieved. It also means open communication between a manager and a team member to see where an employee can improve. Managers who prefer to fly solo may tend to ignore their team. In consequence, their team members may feel frustrated at the lack of feedback over both positive accomplishments and problems they struggle to solve. If they have a manager like this, they’ll look elsewhere to get feedback.

Stagnation and Inattention

It’s often healthy for employees to be able to manage themselves. But if they have absolutely no support structure, they will flounder. It is the duty of a good manager to manage, and that includes finding ways to help team members grow. Managing requires feedback to employees, challenging them when necessary, and helping them see the big picture. Without this, employees will feel that they’re in a dead-end job and leave.

Stifling Intellect or Creativity

Passionate and talented employees get a lot more done. But some managers may refuse to let their employees use their innate creativity to improve a process, workplace, or project. This sounds like a good idea to everyone, right? These managers may feel threatened if someone breaks limits in this way. This insecurity is a sign of a poor manager willing to limit those around him or her rather than let others succeed.

Finally, a bad boss stifles the opportunity to grow intellectually. People want to improve themselves, or at least they should. Successful bosses and managers make people get out of their comfort zones (in a good way) by setting high goals. Then, most importantly, they reach out to help their team succeed. A poor manager won’t challenge their team, leaving employees bored and looking for a challenge elsewhere.

 

Don’t let your managers chase away good employees! Make sure your managers are working to build better teams, and you’ll see greater success through your whole company.

Why Star Players Make Bad Managers

When an employee performs extremely well, earning plenty for your company, it may be tempting to promote them to manager. After all, they might encourage others to succeed, right? However, a recent study by the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research suggests that maybe you shouldn’t.

A Bad Boss in the Making

In order to move up the pay ladder in most companies, generally a person must be promoted to management positions. And the role of manager seems like the perfect reward for that one great employee. It comes with higher pay, greater responsibility to help that person grow, and more perks. And, some employers may hope, one high-flying team member can share those skills with a whole group, increasing productivity overall.

However, not everyone excels at managing other people. Sometimes that star employee is good at leading a team for just a short time, but you may see a decline in performance if they take over long-term. Also, though they may be able to make friends and work together, they may not show the empathy and desire to help others that is essential for a manager.

Should you end up with a person like this in a management position, you may find you’ve got a manager who dislikes their team, neglects the other employees, and/or is clueless about how to take a group in the right direction. Trust between members of a department may fall, and productivity certainly will. That seemingly great reward, in the end, will cost your business.

What to Do Instead

Want to promote someone to manager? Don’t do it based only on their closed deals or their productivity. Find out who has the drive for their whole team to succeed. Learn who would be helpful, rather than potentially harmful, in a conflict or when an employee is under stress. This kind of person may not be your star employee, but they may make a great manager. That same study found employees and sales thrived under managers who weren’t the top performers.

Along with promoting the right people, rather than just the best salesmen, you may want to examine the structure of your business. Help your company grow a professional career path, not just a managerial stream. Employees have a wide variety of skills that your company can benefit from. Provide more opportunities for motion and growth for those who do well but aren’t suited to become managers. This will help the right people become managers and everyone else stay invested in helping your company grow. And that, we all know, is vital to the longevity of a company, not just star players.